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  • Altaulfo Mangoes

    Jul 05, 2018

    The champagne of fruits. Their trademarked name is "champagne"-all champagne mangoes are ataulfos, but not all ataulfos are champagne mangoes. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    These golden, oval-shaped mangoes are smaller and less fibrous than the traditional mango you're familiar with. They may be tough on the outside, but their bright yellow flesh is soft, juicy, and sweet. Here are some dead giveaways so you'll know when these mangoes are not ripe: when they don't yield to slight pressure, don't give off a strong aroma, or don't show a green tinge on their skin. A few days on the counter in room temperature should do the trick. But if you're in a rush to enjoy, put them in a paper bag with an apple or a banana because it'll really speed up the ripening process. Ripe ataulfos will have slightly wrinkled skin and possibly small brown spots and little scars.

    Ways to Enjoy
    It's getting hot out there! Cool off with a sorbet you can make yourself. Ataulfos can do it all. Try them out in salads, salsas, jams, tarts, pancakes, muffins, and waffles. You can sauté or puree them to add flair to a dish in need of a sweet sauce.

    Availability & Origin
    This variety is ready to go from spring to fall. Primarily grown in Central and Southern Mexico, you can also find them growing in California and Florida in a smaller quantity.

    Storage
    When ripe, don't store them in the fridge-their flesh will brown and they'll lose their flavor. You can place them in the fridge both after they ripen and after they're prepared. Unprepared, they'll last a week; prepared, they should keep for about three days.

  • Bi-Color Corn

    Jul 05, 2018


    Bi-colored corn is a staple on the Fourth of July! And no wonder it's so popular-corn is one of the most widely distributed crops in the world.

    Appearance & Flavor
    The kernels of bi-color corn are white and yellow and are tender, sweet, and juicy. The usual ratio you'll see is 75 percent yellow and 25 percent white. Fresh, tight husks range from pale to dark green-not yellowed or dry. To make a good corn selection, peel back the husk and look for plump, tightly-packed kernels that fill the entire ear. Large kernels at the top show the corn is too mature and will likely be starchy. If you pop a kernel with your fingernail and the liquid is watery, the ear is immature. A stalk that is white, dry, or brown is old and won't be providing that sweet flavor you're looking for.

    Ways to Enjoy
    If you're looking to switch up the classic corn on the cob for the Fourth or if you're bored with your average salad, we've got you covered either way with this recipe. Since sweet corn has high sugar levels, they need to be used in a few days or they will turn starchy and will have a dough-like flavor and texture. Eat them raw in salads, tacos, salsas, and soups, or enjoy them roasted, grilled, or boiled as well.

    Availability & Origin
    Developed on the east coast at the University of Massachusetts in the mid-20th century, bi-colored corn is grown all over the US; in the mid-west and southeast, plus Texas, Colorado, and California. Even Alaska grows corn in their greenhouses. But the largest producer is Iowa-growing triple the entire amount that Mexico provides. With all this production, it's easy to get corn year-round.

    Storage
    Store corn in its husk in the fridge and it'll last a few days. Cooked corn in an air-tight container can last a few days in the fridge. Stocking up on corn for the next sale at your grocery store? Store them in the freezer so they'll last longer. 

  • Red Swiss Chard

    Jul 05, 2018



    Did this 'swiss' throw you off? Red swiss chard-related to the beet-is not actually native to Switzerland. This vegetable is from the Mediterranean. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    Chard leaves are broad and wrinkly with distinct red stalks that feed into red veins throughout the leaves. With the earthy taste of a beet and the saltiness of spinach, the stalks are edible and juicy, yet bitter. When selecting, chose bunches that are not split, brown, or dried out. Dark green leaves and brightly colored stems are the freshest.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Want to be the talk of your next brunch? This frittata will get the people talking! Eat it raw, cooked, sautéed, baked, stewed, and grilled. Toss it into salads, pastas, and soups, or even top your pizza with it.

    Availability & Origin
    You can get ahold of red swiss chard all year long. From May to October, states like California and Washington are the main producers. Between November and April, Arizona, Texas, the Carolinas, and Mexico are the top growers.

    Storage
    Uncooked chard should be stored dry for up to five days in the fridge in a plastic bag, after squeezing out the air. After cooking, keep it in an air-tight container for about four days. Want chard at your disposal? Freeze it and it should last almost a full year.  

  • Patty Pan Squash

    Jul 05, 2018

    This squash has been compared to the looks of a flying saucer or a child's spinning top toy.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Patty pans are bright yellow and they turn green at the tips and their flesh is off-white, crisp, and juicy. They have a bright flavor with a sweet, grass-like finish. You can eat the entire plant, right down to the leaves and flowers. The larger they are, the tougher they become, so chose smaller ones; about two or three inches in diameter. You already know to steer clear of bruises, spots, and punctures, but also make sure to choose those that are bright in color.

    Ways to Enjoy
    It is grilling season, and this patty pan recipe will get your barbecue guests talking.  This diverse summer squash works well raw in salads, on sandwiches, or on top of a pizza. Try them braised, steamed, roasted, and sautéed. Patty pans can even be used as thickening agents in soups and stews.

    Availability & Origin
    Though they peak in summer, patty pans are available any time of the year. They originated in Italy, however, most of the commercial production comes from Central and South America. Here in the US, they are generally found growing in small household gardens or at local farmers markets.  

    Storage
    As a highly perishable veggie, the whole patty pan will last about five days in the fridge. After preparing the patty pan, store your leftovers in an air-tight container for up to three days.

  • Black Kale

    Jul 05, 2018

    Think all kale is bitter? Think again! Black kale is one of the most delectable varieties. You'll also hear it referred to as other aliases like lacinato, tuscan, or dino kale.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Black kale has deep blue-green leaves with purple undertones. A hint of nuttiness accompanies their earthy flavor. When they're young, they are quite tender, but as they mature, they need to be cooked before eating. When choosing black kale, ensure the leaves are not wilted or brown and that the stem ends are not brown, dried out, or slimy.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Want a healthier snack for your upcoming summer barbecue? We have the chip for you.  If young and tender, eating the leaves raw in salads is the best. For mature bunches, cooking them is easier than other kale varieties since they don't take much time. Now you just have to pick a way to prepare them! Try them steamed, braised, stewed, juiced, sautéed, or fried. Put them in your hearty soups or serve with meats and potatoes.

    Availability & Origin
    Available year-round with a peak in winter, black kale grows all over Europe and in Mexico. Though it's native to the Mediterranean, you can find it here in the US, in the New England and Mid-Atlantic corridor, out west in California, Arizona, and the Pacific Northwest, as well as in Texas.

    Storage
    Raw, unwashed, and stored in the fridge in a loose plastic bag, you'll get up to a week out of your kale. After cooking, close your leftovers in an air-tight container for up to four days. Not enough time? Get almost a full year out of your kale by freezing it.

  • Nectarines

    Jul 05, 2018


    Nectarines are just like peaches that decided to drop their fuzzy coats.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Nectarines are similar to peaches in size and shape. The smooth skin of the yellow variety has red, pink, and yellow highlights and the white variety has mostly reddish pink tones. Both varieties are highly fragrant and their flesh is soft and dissolves easily in the mouth. The flavor of a white nectarine is more subdued than the yellow since they are less acidic. The yellow nectarine's flavor is bright and sweet. The pit is inedible in both varieties. Don't even try eating the pits of either variety-the sour taste comes from its high levels of toxic hydrogen cyanide. When selecting them, avoid bruised or punctured ones; they are more susceptible to bruising since they have no fuzz like their peachy cousins. If the stem end is still green, the nectarine is not yet ripe. Leave at room temp and they should ripen in a few days.  

    Ways to Enjoy
    It's summertime! And your next barbecue is bound to be a hit with this great side dish.  Nectarines can be used in any recipe that calls for peaches. Eating them right out of the hand is the most popular way to enjoy, but you can also make desserts, jellies, and syrups from this fruit. 

    Availability & Origin
    Nectarines are available year-round and the peak during the domestic season of late spring into summer. California provides over 90 percent of the production between May to November, with Washington taking care of the rest. From November to April, Chile is our importer of choice. Although, China is the world's largest producer followed by some European countries. The US comes in third.

    Storage
    Do not store nectarines in the fridge until they are fully ripe. Any earlier, they will lose their flavor and juiciness. After they're ripe, place in crisper drawer and they should hold for up to a week. For cut pieces, place them in an air-tight container or tightly wrapped in foil or plastic wrap, and you'll get about three days out of them.

  • Dandelion Greens

    Jul 05, 2018

    Before you grab the weed killer, think about this: before the leaves of this 'weed' were considered a nuisance in the lawn, they were used for culinary and medicinal purposes dating back to the 11th century. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    The leaves of the common dandelion plant range in color from a pale to dark green. The strong flavor is tangy and bitter. The smaller and paler the leaves, the more tender and mild they are, but the larger ones are chewy and quite bitter. If the leaves come from a plant that has already flowered, the flavor is so strong that they are usually past being considered edible. Look for firm leaves and thin stems, and avoid those that looked wilted or limp.

    Ways to Enjoy
    If you're looking for a different way to include veggies in your breakfast, try this egg recipe. They can be eaten raw or cooked. When raw, their flavor pairs well with sweeter ingredients such as apples or peaches in salads. They can also balance well with saltier items like bacon or cheese. They make a great additive to salad dressing and work well infused in olive oil.  As for cooking these greens, try adding them to pastas, casseroles, and sauces.

    Availability & Origin
    Dandelion greens are available year-round. They are native to Eurasia, but they still grow in every hemisphere and in every state in the US, since they are a naturally occurring plant that spreads quickly.

    Storage
    Rinse in cool water, dry completely, and store in an open plastic bag or container. To ensure they don't get too cold, the crisper drawer should do the trick-they'll last a few days.

  • Jackfruit

    Jul 05, 2018



    It commands attention wherever it is... big time. The jackfruit is the largest fruit in the world. They can range in weight anywhere between 10 to 50 pounds, but some of these monsters have been recorded around 80 to 100 pounds.

    Appearance & Flavor
    The oval-shaped jackfruit is covered in fleshy spines. Unripe, they appear green and as they become ripe, they turn golden yellow. The fruit yields to gentle pressure when ripe and gives off a strong onion-like odor. Though jackfruit flesh and seeds are edible, the skin is not. The flesh, which resembles that of a banana, has a texture like chicken... and is even nicknamed the vegetarian's meat.  The tropical flavor of a ripe jackfruit will remind you of mangos, pineapples, and bananas. Don't expect the same pleasant flavor from an unripe one though-it will be crunchier and taste a bit meaty. The seeds are said to taste like chestnuts after roasting.

    Ways to Enjoy
    As you can imagine, cutting one of these giants is quite an intimidating task. Here's a tutorial to show you how.  You'll want to come prepared with gloves and cooking oil; the sap is so sticky that it's used to make glue in some countries.  Jackfruits make great additions to soups, stews, curries, casseroles, and fruit salads-just to name a few. Sick of the same old tuna sandwich? This take on the usual will make you want to ditch the tuna.

    Availability & Origin
    Jackfruits grow from May to August and then again from September to December. Brazil, Thailand, India, and Mexico are top producers, but you can still find very small amounts growing domestically in Florida and the San Diego area.

    Storage 
    Whole unripe jackfruits can sit out on the counter for about six days and about four days for whole ripe ones. After slicing them up, store the pieces in the fridge in an air-tight container for up to four days of use. You can also freeze the cut pieces to get a month out of them.

  • Bitter Melon

    Jul 05, 2018

    If you were picturing a melon, think again. Even though it doesn't resemble the "melon" part of its name, it is true to its name as far as being bitter-it's one of the most bitter in the world.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Bitter melons are long and slender, similar to a cucumber, but with rough, bumpy skin. Both the skin and flesh are edible. The flesh-the bitter part-is off-white with white seeds and quite crisp. When harvested, they are green while they're young, but once they mature, they turn orange. The more mature the melon, the more bitter.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Dying to try something new but not sure where to start? Give this traditional Chinese dish a shot. Bitter melons also make good company in your stir fries, stews, and curries. Or try them pickled or braised.

    Availability & Origin
    Native to India and grown across Asia, Africa, and Mexico, these fruits are available year-round. They can also grow in the southern US; in states like Florida and South Carolina. 

    Storage 
    For three days' worth of use, store them in the fridge whole and unwashed. After cutting, bitter melons begin the breakdown process, so it is better to prepare them after slicing them up rather than storing them that way.

  • Lyon Artichokes

    Jul 05, 2018


    The Lyon Artichoke is the king of all artichoke varieties, since they are the biggest. The Lyon also happens to have the biggest heart. Literally.

    Appearance & Flavor
    They are a commanding size; each Lyon can weigh at least one pound. Their tapered, thorny leaves are rounded and tightly wrapped around its center. This variety has the largest artichoke heart out of all of them, and they are sweet with a nutty, butter-like finish. To pick the best artichoke, find one with the leaves still tightly packed and  don't let a few brown spots scare you off.

    Ways to Enjoy
    The heart of the Lyon variety is its prized possession. Make a prized salad out of it. You can steam, braise, grill, and roast them. As for the hearts, they are great for sauces, soups, and purees, or top salads and pizza with some slices. Preparing an artichoke may look daunting with the spines and all, but you'll learn the tips and tricks with this short video.

    Availability & Origin
    During the spring and then again in the fall, these artichokes are at  their best. California is the largest producer by a landslide; 99 percent of artichokes in the US are grown there.

    Storage
    Store them unwashed in a plastic bag for up to a week in the fridge. Do not wash them until you are ready to prepare them. If you see the leaves beginning to spread away from the center, that's a sign that you should eat it as soon as possible.

  • Guava

    May 04, 2018

    With more than 100 species this tropical fruit, there's a flavor for everyone. We will focus on the most popular variety, the common guava, which is also known as the apple guava due to its color.

    Appearance & Flavor
    This smooth, spherical fruit gives off a tropical aroma and has a flavor like a mix of lemons and pineapples to match. When they are ripe, they are light green and may have some yellowness. Their flesh is the texture of a firm banana with the juiciness of an apple. To check for ripeness, gently press the skin-it should be somewhat soft and give slightly to pressure. Dark green ones that do not give to pressure are not yet ripe. Here's a little trick to quicken the ripening process: place them in a paper bag with an apple for 24 hours.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Of the many things you can do with guavas, we are definitely melting over this summertime jelly. Aside from that mouthwatering option, you can eat them raw, add them into desserts like cakes or custards, puree them, caramelize them, or enhance your typical juices with a few slices.

    Availability & Origin
    From spring to winter, these guavas are growing in the Caribbean, Central and South America, and Mexico.

    Storage
    When ripe, store your guavas at room temperature for up to five days.

  • Fiddleheads

    May 04, 2018


    Fiddleheads grow from ferns that arise from swamps and marshes-it's a true swamp thing.

    Appearance & Flavor
    These tightly wound button-like parts of the fern are a sight to be seen. Fiddleheads are light green with fuzzy scales. They are crunchy, but have a gelatin-like flesh with an earthy flavor and a mineral finish when raw. Cooking significantly reduces the mineral flavor and a pine nut/artichoke type flavor emerges in its place. If they are no longer rigid and are becoming gummy, then they are no longer edible.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Looking for a spring appetizer that will turn heads? These tarts are just the thing.  Steaming or boiling them is an option, but if you like your fiddleheads crunchy, this may not be your favorite way to prepare them. If you sauté them without water, they will hold their crunch much better.

    Availability & Origin
    Fiddleheads are available from April to late May. As mentioned before, they emerge in the swamps and marshes of Canada and the eastern United States.

    Storage
    They will last up to a week in your fridge. Since they have such a short season, you'll want to freeze your fiddleheads if you want them to last longer-and here's a video on how to freeze them.

  • Morel Mushrooms

    May 04, 2018


    Where other vegetation falls in the face of fire, these mushrooms love the flames. In many areas, morels will grow abundantly in the wake of a recent forest fire and can thrive there for up to two years after.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Morel mushrooms look like they could house bees in their honeycomb holes and inside, they are hollow from the stem to the tip. They range in color from light gray to dark brown-the darker they are, the stronger their earthy hazelnut flavor will be. They are a very meaty mushroom that gives off a wood smoking smell. When picking out fresh mushrooms, select the ones that are firm, yet spongy.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Never eat them raw. But not to worry, they don't need to cook long to release their flavor. Morels are great for creams, sauces, in pasta dishes, or as their own side. Here are two ways to prepare them; one recipe for fresh mushrooms and another for dried ones.    

    Availability & Origin
    Since they do not flourish well for commercial production, you can only get these mushrooms fresh in spring and as late as early June. They can, however, be bought dried any time of year. Remember how we mentioned they grow well in scorched areas? Most foragers will immediately visit areas that have experienced recent forest fires to seek these mushrooms out.

    Storage
    Store fresh morels on a tray in a single layer and cover them with a damp towel for them to last three days. When dried, you can refrigerate or freeze them in a tolerant bag and they can last from six months to almost a year.

  • Sunrise Papaya

    Apr 06, 2018


    This papaya variety is known as the sweetest of them all-and we have a sweet recipe in store for you below...

    Appearance & Flavor
    Sunrise papayas are long and pear-shaped with light green and smooth leather-like skin. Inside, each papaya has a cavity filled with inedible black seeds. The good news: these fruits allow for very easy seed removal since their cavities are not very deep. When they are ripe, the green skin turns a golden orange with small dotted specks. The flesh is firm, juicy, and is said to taste like a sweet combination of peaches and berries.

    Ways to Enjoy
    You'll want to keep this cool snack in mind for this summer! Is there anything that can outdo those popsicles? We don't think so, but you can still use this sweet fruit in smoothies, salads, salsas, and desserts, raw or even grilled.

    Availability & Origin
    Grown in the beautiful, tropical climates of Hawaii, Brazil, Jamaica, and Mexico, these papayas are available all year long.

    Storage
    If the papayas you brought home are not yet ripe, place them in a plastic bag at room temperature and you'll know they're ready when they turn mostly yellow. After they've ripened, you can take that plastic bag from the counter and place it in the fridge for about three days.

  • Savoy Spinach

    Apr 06, 2018


    In honor of National Spinach Day earlier this week on March 26, we are featuring this variety that is not your typical spinach.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Savoy and normal spinach are both dark green, but unlike the smooth leaves of the regular variety, the savoy type has crinkled leaves. Its flavor is strong and more earthy than regular spinach, and its tougher texture makes it chewier. Make sure to buy bunches that are dark green with crisp leaves. Avoid any with limp, wet leaves or those that have yellow spots.

    Ways to Enjoy
    In need of a quick and easy side dish for a get-together but don't know where to start? Try your hand at this simple savoy spinach side. Remember to wash the spinach carefully since they tend to be gritty. They are best when cooked down or sautéed and they hold their texture and shape better than regular spinach. Often, they are used as a substitute for chards, collards, and kales-so feel free to switch out your usual.

    Availability & Origin
    Savoy spinach is available all year long. California is the largest grower for the spring and summer months, but you can get your spinach fix from Arizona the remaining seasons.

    Storage
    Washing activates the breakdown process of savoy spinach, so don't wash them before you're ready to use them. To store them until future use, keep them unwashed in a plastic bag and they should last about three days.

  • Fava Beans

    Apr 06, 2018


    The fava bean is an old-timer, that's for sure. It's known as one of the oldest crops since its earliest remains in Israel dated back to the Neolithic period-a.k.a. the Stone Age.

    Appearance & Flavor
    Similar in looks to the lima bean, these plump yellow or lime-colored beans are cushioned inside the pod by what looks like cotton. The beans are tender, yet the texture can be creamy or starchy depending on the age of the bean and how they are prepared. The sweet flavor has a grassy undertone. When picking your pods, look for the ones that are firm and fully-filled. Small bumps indicate that the pod is younger and easier to shell. If you aren't a pro at shelling yet, we've got you covered.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Need a new dip for your March Madness get-together? We thought so. Check this out. Where else can you throw in some fava beans? Try them blanched, braised, or pureed with your salads, soups, and sauces.

    Availability & Origin
    These beans are available fresh from March until May. If you want them beyond those three months, you can always purchase them canned, dried, or frozen.

    Storage
    Fava beans will last almost a week if stored in a sealed plastic bag.

     

  • Red Cabbage

    Apr 06, 2018


    The color of this cabbage is so vibrant and lasting that it can be used as a dye for clothing. Who's in for a cabbage tie-dye session?

    Appearance & Flavor
    Red cabbages have large red-maroon oval heads and tightly-wrapped leaves with frilled edges, and they have pale, well-defined ribs. Make sure to choose a cabbage that is firm and bright in color. Avoid wilted and brown leaves. The flavor of red cabbage is milder and sweeter than that of other varieties.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Won't the guests at your next gathering be surprised when the dip comes in a cabbage bowl? Often used as a substitute for the Napa variety, red cabbages are generally more readily available. They will not lose their color when cooked, in fact, they tend to stain the other foods it's prepared with. Make sure to discard the outer leaves prior to preparation. The cabbage can be used in salads, slaws, kimchi, and filling for dumplings. Not to mention you can braise or pickle them.

    Availability & Origin
    These cabbages grow year-round and peak in the summer months. More than 70 percent of the American production comes from California, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Texas.

    Storage 
    If you're not using the cabbage right away, place it unwashed in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to a week. After cooking the cabbage, it will last one week in an airtight container or wrapped tightly in foil or plastic wrap.

  • Collard Greens

    Apr 06, 2018

    Collard greens, dating back to ancient times, are the official vegetable of South Carolina as of 2011.

    Appearance & Flavor
    The leaves are broad and paddle-shaped. Their color can range widely along the spectrum of green. You'll see they have distinct white veins and ribs. With a strong and bitter flavor, these greens have a 'bite' to them. They are not soft like spinach; in fact, the chewier the collard, the fresher it is.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Wraps can be healthy! Just wrap the contents with this versatile veggie. When braised or blanched, you'll taste the flavor of collard greens at its best. When raw, they are much more bitter than when cooked, yet can bring a new dimension to salads. Another popular way to prepare collard greens is to pickle them.

    Availability & Origin
    These greens are available year-round, yet they are said to have the best flavor and texture between late winter and early spring. They grow all over the US, however, southern states like North and South Carolina and Mississippi have the largest concentration and the highest production.

    Storage
    Do not wash your collard greens until you're ready to use them since water begins the decaying process. Place them in an air-tight bag in your fridge and they'll last almost a week. Need to keep them fresh longer? Freeze them for up to 10 months of use. However, they need to be blanched. After cooking, they last for five days refrigerated in an air-tight container.

  • Opal Apple

    Mar 05, 2018


    These unique, non-GMO apples are a cross between Golden Delicious and Topaz apples. What makes them so unique? The fact that they don't brown after cutting!

    Appearance & Flavor
    Opals are bright yellow, not to be confused with paler yellow parent the Golden Delicious. Their skin will show russeting, or yellowish-brown skin or patches. Their creamy flesh is crispy and soft, and tastes sweet and tangy. Getting a whiff of an opal's aroma will remind you of a floral bouquet.

    Ways to Enjoy
    Taco Tuesday normally spans lunch and dinner, but opal apples will  help you take it into dessert time. This doesn't mean that they can't be a great addition to lunch dishes such as salads, soups, and sandwiches. Or a snack, right out of the hand. And, obviously, they make delicious pies, cakes, and tarts. 

    Availability & Origin
    These apples are available from November to March. They were developed in the Czech Republic in the 1990's, but their debut in the United States came in 2010 by Broetje Orchards in Washington, which owns the exclusive rights to the variety.

    Storage
    Place your opal apples in a fruit or crisper drawer. If you don't have one, an uncovered container or bowl in the back of the fridge will do. Refrigerated, they'll last a few months at most. When stored at room temperature in a fruit bowl or on the counter, they will keep for three days or so.

  • Star Fruit

    Mar 05, 2018

    You'll be seeing stars with this unique tropical fruit that is also known as a carambola. 

    Appearance & Flavor
    The star fruit has five deep ridges that make the slices look like stars, which is how the carambola got its nickname. When ripe, they will be a yellowish green to a deep gold color depending on the variety and it is normal for some browning to appear on the ridges. The skin of the carambola is thin and waxy. The texture of the flesh is crisp, yet chewy, and its flavor is sweet and tangy. When picking them out, be sure to choose firm ones. 

    Ways to Enjoy
    Try out this unique appetizer when having guests over; a tropical spin on traditional bruschetta. The skin is edible, so feel free to eat star fruit just the way it is. Or, get starry-eyed over a fun way to garnish anything from salads to cocktails. They also add a nice new flavor to juices, smoothies, and dressings.  The shape is what makes this fruit so fun. Learn to cut it like a pro with these steps

    Availability & Origin
    Star fruits grow all over the United States; California, Florida, Hawaii, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. When imported, they generally come from Taiwan. They are available year-round.

    Storage
    Non-ripe carambolas can sit on your counter until they ripen, then they should be placed in the fridge in a covered container. This gets you about 10 days of use out of them.

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